Image par David Mark de Pixabay
soleilbleuciel

Knehtilä farm: a model of real sustainability in food and energy production

It is imperative that food production adapts to the enormous challenges we face now and going forward, to enable society to develop resilience and sustainability; the European Union is resolute on this and has endorsed its position with the Green Deal. It is essential, therefore, that European agricultural models evolve.

Knehtilä farm in Finland is at the centre of a cooperative system that focuses on energy self-sufficiency and involves a number of food producers: “Palopuro Agroecological Symbiosis”.

This 380-hectare farm produces cereals and buckwheat for human consumption and chicken feed for a neighbouring henhouse. The oats and buckwheat are made into flakes, granola (a blend of different cereals) and various types of snack.

The purpose is to establish an organic local food production network using bioenergy and recycled nutrients, the intention being to serve as a model for producing and processing organic foodstuffs that are truly self-sufficient in terms of energy and nutrients. It’s a cooperative system in which all the elements of the agricultural production model are interdependent; in other words, a truly self-sufficient agro-ecological symbiosis.

In specific terms, manure and other types of nutritive residue are transformed into biogas, a source of energy (biomass). This gas or energy source is then used for all the activities on the farm that require fuel, such as tractors and the farm bakery. In addition, any surplus fuel can be sold outside the cooperative system. The result of this agro-ecological model is a virtuous production system with direct benefits for the local environment.

It provides consumers with a local source of organic products, either directly from the farm or via local markets, and as well as the purely ‘eco-focused’ aspects of the system, it also creates and stimulates a certain vitality and connects the local community by bringing producers and consumers together.

En vidéo

  1. Create a food production system that is self-sufficient in energy and nutrients, transparent to both producers and consumers.
  2. Increase economic profitability through the integration of different but interconnected operations in production and processing. This integration will reduce the need for external energy inputs such as feed or fertilizer. In addition, the cooperative will generate additional income by selling surplus bioenergy.
  3. Increasing energy self-sufficiency by reducing greenhouse gas emissions per unit of production. Decrease nutrient losses.
  4. Strengthen the local community by reconnecting consumers with the source of production of their food.

Découvrez d'autres expériences locales

Producer

Kleymmings oysters

In the Grebbestad archipelago off the west coast of Sweden, the Klemmings Oysters company handles two types of oyster: the flat European oyster and the

Lire la suite »
Producer

Hand-picking at the farm

Marjo Paakki grows vegetables and rears sheep at Lammaskallio’s farm in Tuusula, Finland, using organic farming methods. Marjo does everything she can to promote the

Lire la suite »